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On a 2-dimensional grid, there are 4 types of squares:

  • 1 represents the starting square.  There is exactly one starting square.
  • 2 represents the ending square.  There is exactly one ending square.
  • 0 represents empty squares we can walk over.
  • -1 represents obstacles that we cannot walk over.

Return the number of 4-directional walks from the starting square to the ending square, that walk over every non-obstacle square exactly once.

 

Example 1:

Input: [[1,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0],[0,0,2,-1]]
Output: 2
Explanation: We have the following two paths: 
1. (0,0),(0,1),(0,2),(0,3),(1,3),(1,2),(1,1),(1,0),(2,0),(2,1),(2,2)
2. (0,0),(1,0),(2,0),(2,1),(1,1),(0,1),(0,2),(0,3),(1,3),(1,2),(2,2)

Example 2:

Input: [[1,0,0,0],[0,0,0,0],[0,0,0,2]]
Output: 4
Explanation: We have the following four paths: 
1. (0,0),(0,1),(0,2),(0,3),(1,3),(1,2),(1,1),(1,0),(2,0),(2,1),(2,2),(2,3)
2. (0,0),(0,1),(1,1),(1,0),(2,0),(2,1),(2,2),(1,2),(0,2),(0,3),(1,3),(2,3)
3. (0,0),(1,0),(2,0),(2,1),(2,2),(1,2),(1,1),(0,1),(0,2),(0,3),(1,3),(2,3)
4. (0,0),(1,0),(2,0),(2,1),(1,1),(0,1),(0,2),(0,3),(1,3),(1,2),(2,2),(2,3)

Example 3:

Input: [[0,1],[2,0]]
Output: 0
Explanation: 
There is no path that walks over every empty square exactly once.
Note that the starting and ending square can be anywhere in the grid.

 

Note:

  1. 1 <= grid.length * grid[0].length <= 20

class Solution { public int uniquePathsIII(int[][] grid) { } }